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Really rare and Out of Print Books for Sale

  • All of these books are originals; the dates and publishers can be found by clicking on the author or title links.
  • This will also provide you with the complete bibliographical details of publication, as well other information relevant to the publication of each volume.
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  • NOTE: We have now proved that the author of the “Junius Letters” was Thomas Paine.

Warning

Reading these books will cause you to lose your intellectual virginity.

Warning: Reading these books may cause you to lose your "intellectual virginity."

We have now proved that Thomas Paine was the author of the “Junius Letters.” Click here to see the proof for yourself.

Author

Ward, Lester Frank

Title

The Iconoclast

Sub-Title

Publisher

 

G. P. Putnam's Sons

Year

1913

City

New York

Edition

Scanned

Searchable

Cleaned

Deluxe

 

50.0000

50.0000

100.0000

200.0000

Description

Quoted from the author's "Glimpses of the Cosmos," Volume 1:

"History.—This was my salutatory editorial in launching The Iconoclast, and this is the proper
place to give an account of that enterprise. The National Liberal Reform League proposed to
"do something," and the thing it did was to start an "organ" for the dissemination of the ideas of its members. At a meeting of the League on January 18, 1870, this action was decided upon, and the name adopted for the organ was : THE OTHER SIDE. I did not like that name, but no better one occurring to me, I acquiesced. On March 8, 1870, the name Iconoclast occurred to me, and I suggested its adoption, which was unanimously and enthusiastically
approved by the League. One of the members was a printer and the composition was
referred to him. Several members offered to contribute, but there must be an editor. This charge fell to me. The idea of publishing was not new. It was not an afterthought. It was in the
minds of the members before that of a league. It was the cause and not the consequence of the League. In anticipation of it I had already, on November 20 and 22, 1869, drawn up a paper embodying what I thought should be said in the first number. This was rewritten on January 14, 1870, further revised on February 10th, and appeared in its present form as the initial foreword of the Iconoclast. The first number of the Iconoclast appeared very soon after its date, March 15, 1870. It was published monthly thereafter for eighteen months. I  continued to edit it all that time and contributed much more than half the matter. This was not all original, but was gathered from all sources. Most of the selections had to be found in libraries and laboriously copied out of the volumes containing them . The League received few recruits, while no less than three of its most active members died during that time, others lost their offices and were compelled to leave Washington, and others grew lukewarm and lost
their interest. The burden grew heavier and heavier upon my shoulders and reached the limit
of endurance in the summer of 1871. But I do not think the quality of the matter deteriorated
and the last number is fully up to the standard of the first. The paper remained unchanged in form and each number consisted of a single sheet of four pages, the pages not numbered  The first twelve numbers are called Volume I, and the remaining six are all there is of Volume II. The pages have each three columns."

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