PS Logo
For a database driven website email us at kcust@wcblue.com

Really rare and Out of Print Books for Sale

  • All of these books are originals; the dates and publishers can be found by clicking on the author or title links.
  • This will also provide you with the complete bibliographical details of publication, as well other information relevant to the publication of each volume.
  • Some  of these books have been scanned and OCR’d (put through an Optical Character Recognition program); therefore they are searchable; that is each word in the text has been indexed.
  • The books are in PDF format and can be read by any computer that has Adobe PDF reader, which almost every computer has installed,  and it can be read with the latest versions of Amazon’s Kindle and other book reading software and hardware.
  • I recently saw a student reading Voltaire’s Philosophical Dictionary on his cell phone.
  • Each book, or set of books, has been individually priced and can be purchased over the phone using VISA, MASTERCARD, or other means.
  • We do accept checks and will ship the the CD, or DVD, once the payment has been processed.
  • Text us, or phone us, at 660-221-1170 and we can make the appropriate arrangements to meet your needs.
  • NOTE: We have now proved that the author of the “Junius Letters” was Thomas Paine.

Warning

Reading these books will cause you to lose your intellectual virginity.

Warning: Reading these books may cause you to lose your "intellectual virginity."

We have now proved that Thomas Paine was the author of the “Junius Letters.” Click here to see the proof for yourself.

Author

Stephen, Leslie

Title

English Literature & Society in the 18th Century

Sub-Title

Publisher

 

Duckworth

Year

1927

City

London

Edition

Scanned

Searchable

Cleaned

Deluxe

2nd edition

50.0000

50.0000

100.0000

200.0000

Description

Quoted from the author's first chapter:

"WHEN I was honoured by the invitation to deliver this course of lectures, I did not accept without some hesitation. I am not qualified to speak with authority upon such subjects as have been treated by my predecessors—the course of political events or the growth of legal institutions. My attention has been chiefly paid to the history of literature, and it might be doubtful whether that study is properly included in the phrase 'historical.' Yet literature expresses men's thoughts and passions, which have, after all, a considerable influence upon their lives. The writer of a people's songs, as we are told, may even have a more powerful influence than the maker of their laws. He certainly reveals more directly the true springs of popular action. The truth has been admitted by many historians who are too much overwhelmed by state papers to find space for any extended application of the method. No one, I think, has shown more clearly how much light could be derived from this source than your Oxford historian J . R. Green, in some brilliant passages of his fascinating book. Moreover, if I may venture to speak of myself, my own interest in literature has always been
closely connected with its philosophical and social significance. Literature may of course be studied simply for its own intrinsic merits. But it may also be regarded as one manifestation of what is called 'the spirit of the age.' I have, too, been much impressed by a further conclusion. No one doubts that the speculative movement affects the social and political — I think that less attention has been given to the reciprocal influence. The philosophy of a period is often treated as though it were the product of impartial and abstract investigation — something worked out by the great thinker in his study and developed by simple logical deductions from the positions established by his predecessors. To my mind, though I cannot now dwell upon the point, the philosophy of an age is in itself determined to a very great extent by the social position. It gives the solutions of the problems forced upon the reasoner by the practical conditions of his time. To understand why certain ideas become current, we have to consider not merely the ostensible logic but all the motives which led men to investigate the most pressing difficulties suggested by the social development. Obvious principles are always ready, like germs, to come to life when the congenial soil is provided  And what is true of the philosophy is equally, and perhaps more conspicuously, true of the artistic and literary embodiment of the dominant ideas which are correlated with the social movement."

[Home] [Books for Sale] [Intellectual Virginity] [Contact Us] [Counseling] [Forgotten Man] [Consulting] [Shipping] [Custom Scanning]