PS Logo
For a database driven website email us at kcust@wcblue.com

Really rare and Out of Print Books for Sale

  • All of these books are originals; the dates and publishers can be found by clicking on the author or title links.
  • This will also provide you with the complete bibliographical details of publication, as well other information relevant to the publication of each volume.
  • Some  of these books have been scanned and OCR’d (put through an Optical Character Recognition program); therefore they are searchable; that is each word in the text has been indexed.
  • The books are in PDF format and can be read by any computer that has Adobe PDF reader, which almost every computer has installed,  and it can be read with the latest versions of Amazon’s Kindle and other book reading software and hardware.
  • I recently saw a student reading Voltaire’s Philosophical Dictionary on his cell phone.
  • Each book, or set of books, has been individually priced and can be purchased over the phone using VISA, MASTERCARD, or other means.
  • We do accept checks and will ship the the CD, or DVD, once the payment has been processed.
  • Text us, or phone us, at 660-221-1170 and we can make the appropriate arrangements to meet your needs.
  • NOTE: We have now proved that the author of the “Junius Letters” was Thomas Paine.

Warning

Reading these books will cause you to lose your intellectual virginity.

Warning: Reading these books may cause you to lose your "intellectual virginity."

We have now proved that Thomas Paine was the author of the “Junius Letters.” Click here to see the proof for yourself.

Author

Farrer, James Anson

Title

Books Condemned to be Burnt

Sub-Title

Publisher

 

Elliot Stock

Year

1892

City

London

Edition

Scanned

Searchable

Cleaned

Deluxe

1st edition

100.0000

100.0000

200.0000

400.0000

Description

This work is part of the "Book-Lovers Library" series which was edited by Henry B. Wheatley (1838 - 1917). Wheatley was a historian, librarian and scholar of repute and editor of the Book-Lovers Library series. Quoted from the author's "Preface."

"When did books first come to be burnt in England by the common hangman, and what was the last book to be so treated? This is the sort of question that occurs to a rational curiosity, but it is just this sort of question to which it is often most difficult to find an answer. Historians are generally too engrossed with the details of battles, all as drearily similar to one another as scenes of murder and rapine must of necessity be, to spare a glance for the far brighter and more instructive field of the mutations or of the progress of manners. The following work is an attempt to supply the deficiency on this particular subject."

"I am indebted to chance for having directed me to the interest of book-burning as an episode in the history of the world's manners, the discursive allusions to it in the old numbers of "Notes and Queries" hinting to me the desirability of a more systematic mode of treatment. To bibliographers and literary historians I conceived that such a work might prove of utility and
interest, and possibly serve to others as an introduction and incentive to a branch of our literary history that is not without its fascination. But I must also own to a less unselfish
motive, for I imagined that not without its reward of delight would be a temporary sojourn among the books which, for their boldness of utterance or unconventional opinions, were not
only not received by the best literary society of their day, but were with ignominy expelled from it. Nor was I wrong in my calculation."

"But could I impart or convey the same delight to others? Clearly all that I could do was to invite them to enter on the same road, myself only subserving the humble functions of a
signpost. I could avoid merely compiling for them a bibliographical dictionary, but I could not treat at length of each offender in my catalogue, without, in so exhausting my subject,
exhausting at the same time my reader's patience. I have tried therefore to give something of the life of their history and times to the authors with whom I came in contact; to cast a little  light on the idiosyncrasies or misfortunes of this one or of that; but to do them full justice, and to  enable the reader to make their complete acquaintance, how was that possible with
any regard for the laws of literary proportion? All I could do was to aim at something less dull than a dictionary, but something far short of a history."

[Home] [Books for Sale] [Intellectual Virginity] [Contact Us] [Counseling] [Forgotten Man] [Consulting] [Shipping] [Custom Scanning]